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Farewell to "Miss Adorabibble"

Last week, our friend and children's author Jobeth Stanfill passed away at Cape Fear Regional Hospital after having a heart attack. She...

Two Book Recommendations

I'd like to share two of my favorite books from last year's reading. Edible Wild Plants of the Carolinas by Musselman & Schafran is a...

Adding a New Book and Bookshelf

This spring/summer, I've decided to start organizing DeepRichDirt books as categories in "bookshelves". First and foremost is the Kids'...

New Book Release

Literature from good local authors; books that are creative, honest, thoughtful, and uniquely interesting to readers somewhere. These are...

A thought from Mark Twain

"Reverence for one's own sacred things -- parents, religion, flag, laws, and respect for one's own beliefs -- these are feelings which we...

The Parable of the Acres

A man was going on a journey. He first called his workers and entrusted to them his land. To one he gave five acres, to another two...

Excellent Books for Anyone in Agriculture

Just a quick reading recommendation for anyone out there in farming, or getting involved in farming. These three are very practical and...

Olive Branches

Lebanon is having a rough time right now. Violence and lots of bad stuff. There’s a mountain village in Lebanon named Bcheale. In that...

The man who inspired DeepRichDirt

I was in California at my little brother Amos’ wedding. Sitting next to me at a table, Amos talked about a children’s story I’d shared...

My Message

I’m not an overly sociable person, and I don’t sport a larger-than-life charismatic personality. I don’t tend to surround myself with...

 

DeepRichDirt Media is a new endeavor!

Please bear with us as we're working on it.

 
Dartmouth Yard Orchard - small Fayetteville slice of Crew Family Orchards
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DeepRichDirt Publishing

Dartmouth Yard Orchard - small Fayetteville slice of Crew Family Orchards

At our house on Dartmouth Drive in Fayetteville, NC, I started cultivating a diverse collection of fruit and berry plants in 2016. It's still young and developing, but here's one look at what regenerative urban permaculture can be. From laying hens to deciduous wood chips, to plain old pines to all the weird and wonderful foods we grow, it's a soil-healing ecosystem in miniature. Although my main focus is on our bigger olive orchard in Wagram (30-40 minutes down the road), this ongoing home project is still very satisfying. I hope more people start doing something like this, especially here in North Carolina, to tackle local food insecurity, draw down more carbon from the atmosphere, and generally grow healthier and happier lives together. Soon, using this mini-orchard as a model template, Amanda and I are helping to develop the Family Life Community Orchard at WoodmenLife chapter 60 (formerly "Woodmen of the World"). Beyond that, we hope to help this concept catch on throughout the region. I'd love to see this whole area one day become not just an olive-growing region but a thriving patchwork of regenerative/holistic agricultural projects big and small. So, every bottle of olive oil or other food product or merchandise that you buy from Crew Family Orchards (as well as every book from DeepRichDirt Publishing) helps a little bit to move this vision forward. As a side note, I'd like to thank NBC Tree Service, Allen Tree Service, and GGG Landscaping and Tree Service for providing good wood chips both here at Dartmouth Drive and at the Woodmen community orchard site. Recycling local carbon is what it's all about. Good people like these step in where local government has let us all down. Maybe one day we'll all get access to the mulched yard waste collected by Cumberland County Waste Management. In the meantime, these private tree service guys are a life-saver. Why do I keep writing this? Why is this description so long? Because the more words and phrases we include in this video, the higher chance it will pop up in more people's searches or browsing on Youtube. You can help by sharing it and spreading the word. If I can do it on a plain old yard space in Fayetteville, NC, you and everyone you know can do something somewhere, too, to heal soil and grow food for your families, neighbors, etc. Youtube allows for up to 5000 words in the description. We're almost halfway there! Let's see, what else might help? How about... An original poem: Don’t know exactly how Old woodlands used to look In the places that are now Barren deserts of Iraq But it seemed to me Modern people there Hope to one day own a tree Or some cooler, kinder air Now I’m visualizing Native forest bounty In the places now comprising Lawns and fields of Hoke County But it seems to pleasure Many people here Making for the kids a desert Mowed and tidy, bare and clear And here's another one: Plant trees, grow thoughts, end wars Bring them all, short and tall, move in force Retell my mind the thrust Lay it on, thick and strong, for I must Never cease, yet remind, till we’re dead Over fields let the groves wider spread You’ll be the numbers, I’ll be the force You hold the rhythm, I pour the verse Your wordless poem, My silent words Plant trees by millions Grow thoughts and end wars Both of these and hundreds more will be in my upcoming book of poetry. Funny how many ideas come while cultivating the trees. The variety of ventures and different lines of effort may seem scattered or chaotic (almost like a wild forest?) but somehow it all works together under the surface. Somehow it all connects. If any of this nonsense has connected with you in a meaningful way, that makes it worthwhile. (And if it's worthwhile, is it really "nonsense"?) Alright, we're roughly 3/4 of the way to 5000 words. Let's get back to talking about Dartmouth Yard Orchard. We have six laying hens adding nitrogen to the soil and giving us eggs (and an occasional nuisance). Different chickens have come and gone. Just yesterday, for example, we had a baby... but a hawk ate it this morning. True story. Not the first casualty. It happens. What else? Mushrooms! Various awesome mushrooms pop up randomly here and there throughout the property. I'm told that's a good sign. You might be wondering, "Don't the neighbors think that yard is ugly?" Yes, some of them undoubtedly do. Everyone has opinions... some more pronounced (and often more uninformed) than others. But guess what? Ugly is fine! Because ugly is natural, ugly is edible, and last I checked, tidy and manicured lawns don't taste very good to hungry humans. In conclusion, I apologize if any of this has come across as bragging or being rude. Setting aside the quirks of my communication method, I genuinely hope the Dartmouth Yard Orchard has inspired someone out there to forget about neat lawns and grow a thriving ecosystem around your home. The more people get started, the better off we'll all be down the road.